Homeless shelters

FILE - In this photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff speaks at a luncheon in San Francisco. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff and his wife Lynne are donating $30 million to UCSF to research the causes and potential solutions for homelessness. The five-year initiative housed at the University of California, San Francisco will conduct academic research into homelessness and train future researchers in the field. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
May 01, 2019 - 11:58 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A San Francisco billionaire is donating $30 million to the University of California, San Francisco, to research root causes of homelessness and potential solutions. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff, a city native, has embraced homelessness as a philanthropic cause, pumping millions...
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A pair of women opposed to a proposed homeless shelter hold up signs during a meeting of the Port Commission Tuesday, April 23, 2019, in San Francisco. San Francisco port commissioners are deciding whether to approve a new homeless shelter along the city's touristy and residential Embarcadero. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
April 23, 2019 - 11:51 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Port commissioners Tuesday night unanimously approved a proposal to lease land for a 200-bed temporary homeless shelter in the popular Embarcadero tourist area as the city struggles with a severe shortage of affordable housing. Supporters cheered as the commissioners voted...
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In this photo taken Sunday, March 10, 2019 in Saratoga, N.Y., 8-year-old Tanitoluwa Adewumi poses with his trophy after winning the New York State Scholastic Championships tournament for kindergarten through third grade. The victory will be his family's ticket out of a homeless shelter. Tani and his family have lived in a New York City shelter since fleeing Nigeria in 2017. (Russell Makofsky via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 1:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — An 8-year-old boy's victory as New York state chess champion will be his family's ticket out of a homeless shelter. The New York Times reported that Tani Adewumi (TAH'-nee ah-deh-WOO'-mee) won the state chess title for his age group this month even though he learned to play only...
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In this Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo Worcester Police officer Angel Rivera, right, returns a license to an unidentified man as Rivera asks if he has been tested for Hepatitis A at the entrance to a tent where the man spent the night in a wooded area, in Worcester, Mass. Dan Cahill, City of Worcester sanitary inspector, walks behind center. The city was hit hard when recent hepatitis A outbreaks across the country started sickening and killing homeless people and illicit drug users. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
March 12, 2019 - 10:41 am
WORCESTER, Mass. (AP) — This industrial city in central Massachusetts has had many nicknames through the years, including "the Heart of the Commonwealth" and "Wormtown." Among them was this less-known medical moniker: "Hepatitisville." Worcester has endured several outbreaks of the liver-battering...
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People stand around a car that was overturned by a tornado in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Jan. 28, 2019. A tornado and pounding rains smashed into the eastern part of Cuba's capital overnight, toppling trees, bending power poles and flinging shards of metal roofing through the air as the storm cut a path of destruction across eastern Habana. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
January 28, 2019 - 11:39 am
HAVANA (AP) — The Latest on Cuba's deadly weather (all times local): 12:21 p.m. Some of the heaviest damage from the rare Havana tornado is in the eastern borough of Guanabacoa, where the apparent twister tore the roof off a shelter for dozens of homeless families. Cubans enduring long waits for...
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December 18, 2018 - 1:45 pm
In a story Dec. 17 about a count of homeless people in the U.S., The Associated Press reported erroneously which tax Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Executive Director Peter Lynn credited for helping reduce homelessness in the 2018 count. Lynn was crediting a Los Angeles city ballot measure...
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FILE - This file photo from Friday, Dec. 7, 2018, shows John Flickner, 78, holding his medical marijuana vaporizer inside a Niagara Falls, N.Y., homeless shelter. Although he has a prescription, the wheelchair-bound Flickner was evicted from a federally subsidized housing facility that has a zero-tolerance policy on drugs, highlighting the conflict between state and federal marijuana rules. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson, File)
December 11, 2018 - 6:24 pm
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. (AP) — A 78-year-old New York man who was evicted from federally subsidized housing because he uses medical marijuana for pain said Tuesday that the conflicting state and federal pot laws that left him homeless are now threatening his medical care. "The federal government has...
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Undertakers carry the coffin with a 17-years-old girl in St. Augustin near Bonn, western Germany, Monday, Dec. 12, 2018 after the body had been found at a shelter for homeless people and others in western Germany and a resident has been detained. The girl's parents had reported her missing on Friday from her home in a neighboring German region. On Sunday, clothes and a handbag belonging to her were found next to a lake. (Federico Gambarini/dpa via AP)
December 03, 2018 - 5:55 am
BERLIN (AP) — German police say the body of a missing 17-year-old girl has been found at a shelter for homeless people and others in western Germany and a resident has been detained. The girl's parents had reported her missing on Friday from her home in a neighboring German region. On Sunday,...
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File-This undated file photo shows the entrance to an alley known as Cooper Court, a homeless camp in Boise, Idaho. A federal appellate court says cities can't prosecute people for sleeping on the streets if they have nowhere else to go. In a ruling handed down Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2018, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with six homeless Boise, Idaho residents who sued the city in 2009 alleging that a local ordinance that bans sleeping on the streets amounted to cruel and unusual punishment. The ruling could impact several other cities across the western U.S.(Adam Cotterell/Boise State Public Radio via AP, File)
September 04, 2018 - 6:21 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Cities can't prosecute people for sleeping on the streets if they have nowhere else to go because it amounts to cruel and unusual punishment, which is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court said Tuesday. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with six homeless people...
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