Marine biology

FILE -In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, a baby dugong named Marium swims near the hull of a boat off Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
October 03, 2019 - 5:30 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A top marine biologist has urged Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an imperiled sea mammal, after their death toll for the year in Thai waters has already climbed to a record 21. Thon Thamrongnawasawat said on his Facebook page that the carcass of a...
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September 12, 2019 - 10:43 am
BERLIN (AP) — Bottlenose dolphins in the English Channel harbor a "toxic cocktail" of chemicals, some of which have been banned for decades and which may be harming the rare marine mammals' health, scientists said Thursday. Belgian and French scientists said they've detected high accumulations of...
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A row of hearts, each with the name of a victim, adorn a growing memorial to those who died aboard the dive boat Conception, seen early Friday morning, Sept. 6, 2019 at the harbor in Santa Barbara, Calif. The Sept. 2 fire took the lives of 34 people on the ship off Santa Cruz Island off the Southern California coast near Santa Barbara (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)
September 06, 2019 - 6:13 pm
From a veteran water polo coach to a Singaporean data scientist, the passengers aboard the ill-fated Conception dive boat were linked by their love for the water. Here are the victims who have been identified so far from the deadly fire that engulfed the vessel, killing 34 people off California's...
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A memorial for the victims of the Conception vessel is seen outside of the Sea Landing at Santa Barbara Harbor in Santa Barbara, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019. Officials say no one likely escaped the flames that tore through a boat packed with scuba divers and the search for survivors has been called off. (AP Photo/Christian Monterrosa)
September 03, 2019 - 8:31 pm
SANTA BARBARA, California (AP) — A broken-hearted mother posted on her Facebook page Tuesday that her three daughters, their father and his wife were among those presumed dead after flames engulfed a dive boat off Southern California over the holiday weekend. Susana Rosas of Stockton, California,...
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Divers with the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's Dive Team prepare to search for a second day for missing people following a dive boat fire off Southern California's coast that killed dozens sleeping below deck, in Santa Barbara, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019. (AP Photo by Christian Monterrosa )
September 03, 2019 - 8:07 pm
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — Flames roared through a boat of sleeping scuba divers so quickly that it appears none of the 34 people below deck could escape, authorities said Tuesday as they ended their search without finding anyone who was missing still alive from the Labor Day tragedy off the...
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August 29, 2019 - 8:09 am
HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — A group that monitors sea turtles in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, has reported finding a two-headed Loggerhead hatchling. News outlets report Sea Turtle Patrol Hilton Head Island says the hatchling was found alive Tuesday and released into the ocean. The group...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread far and wide. Some experts have questioned whether there’s enough plankton in the lake to sustain the invasive carp away from shoreline areas. But the new report released Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, by University of Michigan scientists says despite a drop-off of plankton caused by exotic mussels, the voracious carp could feed on other organic material when venturing into deeper waters. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
August 12, 2019 - 8:38 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread farther. The invasive fish have infested the Mississippi River and dozens of tributaries. Authorities are debating how to keep them out of the Great Lakes, where...
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In this photo provided by Kevin Bryant, a dominant male bluehead wrasse, upper left, defends its spawning territory and a group of females, yellow, off the coast of Florida. Normally the male and females stay as they are, feeding together and occasionally mating. But if a predator happens to snatch up the lead male, the dominant female in the group will take up rank _ by becoming a male. (Kevin Bryant via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 1:03 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New Zealand researchers are offering the first detailed view of the molecular machinery that allows some fish to change their sex. Roughly 500 types of fish can switch between male and female as adults when circumstances call for it. The study published Wednesday examined a tropical...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2017, file photo, provided by NOAA Fisheries a North Pacific right whale swims in the Bering Sea west of Bristol Bay. Federal scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have recorded singing by a rare right whale for the first time. Researchers used moored acoustic recorders to capture patterned calls made by male North Pacific right whales. Researchers detected four distinct songs over eight years at five locations in the southeast Bering Sea. (NOAA Fisheries via AP, File)
June 19, 2019 - 5:11 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — It's not America's Top 40, but it's a cutting edge song. Federal marine biologists for the first time have recorded singing by one of the rarest whales on the planet, the North Pacific right whale. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers used moored...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 12:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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