Medical research

FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2018, file photo, Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., speaks to media on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lawmakers clashed over science, ethics and politics Thursday, Dec. 13, at a House hearing on using fetal tissue in critically important medical research, as the Trump administration reviews the government’s ongoing support for such studies. “Most of my constituents don’t understand when you harvest baby parts, why that is OK,” said Meadows, who chaired the hearing by the Oversight & Government Reform committee. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
December 13, 2018 - 1:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers clashed over science, ethics and politics on Thursday at a House hearing on using fetal tissue in critically important medical research. The Trump administration is reviewing whether taxpayer dollars are being properly used to fund for such studies. Research fields in...
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December 03, 2018 - 1:28 pm
GENEVA (AP) — The chief of the World Health Organization says his agency is assembling experts to consider the health impacts of gene editing. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Monday that gene editing "cannot be just done without clear guidelines" and experts should "start from...
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In this Oct. 9, 2018, photo, Zhou Xiaoqin installs a fine glass pipette into a sperm injection microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. China's government on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018, ordered a halt to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 29, 2018 - 12:58 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — China's government ordered a halt Thursday to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies, as a group of leading scientists declared that it's still too soon to try to make permanent changes to DNA that can be inherited by future...
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FILE- In this April 26, 2006 file photo, John Kelly Jr. fishes for striped bass in Boston Harbor. A canary in a coal mine? How about a flounder in a harbor? Offering a rare bit of good environmental news, scientists have documented a dramatic rebound in fish health they say shows how once horribly polluted Boston Harbor has cleaned up its act. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
November 29, 2018 - 12:58 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A canary in a coal mine? How about a flounder in a harbor? In a study published last week in the journal Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts declared that flounder in Boston's once notoriously polluted harbor are now...
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November 28, 2018 - 5:03 pm
Australian Army veteran Wolfgang Neszpor was stunned when he heard his recently repaired shoulder squeak. "You could really hear it," he said. He recalled when the surgeon examined him and lifted up his arm, "It was a stupid amount of pain." Two months earlier, Neszpor, 36, had gotten a new...
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FILE - In this Sept. 8, 2015 file photo, a reluctant student is pulled into the first day of kindergarten at an elementary School in Clio, Mich. A study shows the youngest children in a classroom are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It’s an intriguing finding for parents considering what’s called “kindergarten redshirting,” or delaying school entry. Researchers say doctors should be aware of how classroom comparisons shape diagnosis. The paper was published Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018, by the New England Journal of Medicine. (Christian Randolph/The Flint Journal via AP, File)
November 28, 2018 - 4:05 pm
A study shows the youngest children in kindergarten are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in early grades. It's an intriguing finding for parents on the fence about when to start their child in school. The study found younger students, especially boys, are...
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In this Oct. 9, 2018 photo, Zhou Xiaoqin, left, loads Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA molecules into a fine glass pipette as Qin Jinzhou watches at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He Jiankui claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 26, 2018 - 3:43 pm
Designer babies might be here sooner than anyone reckoned. A Chinese researcher who says he created gene-edited babies crossed what most scientists consider a forbidden line. It's not clear if the claim is true and if so, how the twin girls whose DNA reportedly was altered will fare as they grow...
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In this Monday, April 21, 2008 file photo, a U.S soldier looks through the scope of his weapon during a night patrol in Mandozai, in Khost province, Afghanistan, seen through night vision equipment. About 400,000 veterans had a PTSD diagnosis in 2013, according to the Veterans Affairs health system. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
November 15, 2018 - 5:41 pm
Meditation worked as well as traditional therapy for military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder in a small experiment sponsored by the Department of Defense. One method preferred by the Department of Veterans Affairs is exposure therapy, but it doesn't work for everyone and many can't...
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November 14, 2018 - 5:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-term exposure to a chemical compound currently used for making nonstick coatings appears to be dangerous, even in minute amounts, according to draft findings released Wednesday by the Environmental Protection Agency. It was the first time EPA weighed in on newer, supposedly...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012 file photo, a pedestrian talking on a cellphone is silhouetted in front of a fountain in Philadelphia. Two U.S. government agencies are giving conflicting interpretations of a safety study on cellphone radiation: One says it causes cancer in rats. The other says there's no reason for people to worry. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
November 01, 2018 - 4:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Two U.S. government agencies are giving conflicting interpretations of a safety study on cellphone radiation: One says it causes cancer in rats. The other says there's no reason for people to worry. No new research was issued Thursday. Instead, the National Toxicology Program...
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