Water pollution

FILE - This file satellite image provided by NASA and taken by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at the International Space Station, shows Tropical Storm Barry as it bears down on Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida as it makes its way through the Gulf of Mexico. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (Christina Koch/NASA via AP, File)
July 12, 2019 - 11:28 pm
Tropical Storm Barry could harm the Gulf coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it's hard to predict how severe the damage will be. That's because three distinct factors are coming together at once. The storm is expected to create a surge of up to 3 feet (1 meter) and bring...
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Water flows through Conowingo Dam, a hydroelectric dam spanning the lower Susquehanna River near Conowingo, Md., on Thursday, May 16, 2019. Officials once counted on the dam to block large amounts of sediment in the Susquehanna from reaching Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, but the reservoir behind the dam has filled with sediment far sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
July 06, 2019 - 8:24 pm
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job of harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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In this June 3, 2017 photo, Dr. Joan Perry of Kinston, left, answers a question during a debate with and state Rep. Greg Murphy, a Greenville physician, in Greenville, N.C. The two Republicans are running in a special primary election to be held July 9 for North Carolina's 3rd Congressional seat. (Deborah Griffin/The Daily Reflector via AP)
July 06, 2019 - 8:53 am
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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Johnny Rowan stands outside Burning River Coffee, Friday, June 14, 2019, in Lakewood, Ohio. Rowan’s is one of 90 active businesses registered with the state that have “burning river” in their names, inspired by the Cuyahoga River’s most famous fire. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
June 18, 2019 - 9:43 am
CLEVELAND (AP) — Fifty years after the Cuyahoga River's most infamous fire helped spawn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, artists and entrepreneurs have turned old jokes into inspiration and forged decades of embarrassment into a fiery brand of Cleveland pride. "Everybody knows Cuyahoga...
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FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2017 file photo, heavy equipment is used at an ash storage site at Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn. The nation’s largest public utility has agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards of coal ash from unlined pits at Gallatin Fossil Plant. In a Thursday, June 13, 2019 settlement, the Tennessee Valley Authority says it will excavate a majority of coal ash at its Gallatin Fossil Plant. .(AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
June 13, 2019 - 6:06 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The nation's largest public utility on Thursday agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards (9.2 million cubic meters) of coal ash from unlined pits at a Tennessee coal-burning power plant. Prompted by two environmental groups, the state sued the Tennessee...
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June 10, 2019 - 11:50 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Scientists are predicting a near-record Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" where the water holds too little oxygen to sustain marine life. "A major factor contributing to the large dead zone this year is the abnormally high amount of spring rainfall in many parts of the Mississippi River...
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June 10, 2019 - 11:37 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Scientists are predicting a near-record Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" where the water holds too little oxygen to sustain marine life. "A major factor contributing to the large dead zone this year is the abnormally high amount of spring rainfall in many parts of the Mississippi River...
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Carnival Corp. President Arnold Donald, left, arrives at federal court, Monday, June 3, 2019, in Miami. Carnival Corp. is in federal court for a hearing on what to do about allegations that it has continued polluting the oceans from some of its cruise ships despite agreeing years ago to stop (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
June 03, 2019 - 5:24 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Carnival Corp. reached a settlement Monday with federal prosecutors in which the world's largest cruise line agreed to pay a $20 million penalty because its ships continued to pollute the oceans despite a previous criminal conviction aimed at curbing similar conduct. Senior U.S...
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FILE - This Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration building behind FDA logos at a bus stop on the agency's campus in Silver Spring, Md. The Food and Drug Administration’s first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA researchers presented at a scientific conference in Europe. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
June 03, 2019 - 10:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA...
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FILE - This Aug. 7, 2014, file photo, shows a contract employee watching a crews excavate contaminated soil at a site where millions of gallons of jet fuel leaked underground over decades at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M. A coalition of state lawmakers and nonprofit groups took the first step toward suing the U.S. Air Force on Friday, May 31, 2019, saying it wants firm deadlines for cleaning up jet fuel contamination at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city. The coalition filed a notice of intent to sue, saying the contamination at Kirtland Air Force Base near Albuquerque is a danger to public health and the environment. It wants an agreement that sets a cleanup schedule with clear deadlines and penalties. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
May 31, 2019 - 3:54 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A coalition of state lawmakers and nonprofit groups took the first step toward suing the U.S. Air Force on Friday, saying it wants firm deadlines for cleaning up jet fuel contamination at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city. The coalition filed a notice of intent to...
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