Water pollution

In this March 12, 2019 satellite photo provided by NOAA, shows the Great Lakes in various degrees of snow and ice. A scientific report says the Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., which likely will bring more flooding and other extreme weather events such as heat waves and drought. The warming climate also could mean less overall snowfall even as lake-effect snowstorms get bigger. The report by researchers from universities primarily from the Midwest says agriculture could be hit especially hard, with later spring planting and summer dry spells. (NOAA via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 4:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
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FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 12:59 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in the Cuyahoga River, which became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine...
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An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The island of solar panels could give purpose to mine refuse in Chile by using them to generate clean energy and reduce water evaporation.(AP Photo / Esteban Felix)
March 15, 2019 - 11:04 am
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — A floating island of solar panels is being tested in Chile as a way to generate clean energy and reduce water loss at mine operations, a cornerstone of the Andean country's economy that uses huge amounts of electricity and water. The experimental "Las Tortolas" power-...
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FILE - In this Friday, Sept. 14, 2018 file photo, Russ Lewis covers his eyes from a gust of wind and a blast of sand as Hurricane Florence approaches Myrtle Beach, S.C. According to a scientific report from the United Nations released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
March 13, 2019 - 5:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says. Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics,...
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FILE - This Aug. 7, 2014, image shows a contract employee watching a crews excavate contaminated soil at a site where millions of gallons of jet fuel leaked underground over decades at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M. After excavating thousands of tons of soil and treating millions of gallons of water, New Mexico regulators say the U.S. Air Force still has work to do to clean up the contamination. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
March 11, 2019 - 5:13 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Air Force has excavated thousands of tons of soil and treated millions of gallons of water contaminated by jet fuel at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city, but state regulators say the military still has more cleanup to do. The New Mexico environment...
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March 05, 2019 - 6:17 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico on Tuesday sued the U.S. Air Force over groundwater contamination at two bases, saying the federal government has a responsibility to clean up plumes of toxic chemicals left behind by past military firefighting activities. The contamination — linked to a class of...
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February 26, 2019 - 3:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly released security camera footage undermines Trump administration claims that a reporter for The Associated Press tried to force her way into the Environmental Protection Agency headquarters to cover a summit last year on drinking water contaminants. Video obtained through a...
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February 21, 2019 - 1:10 pm
In a story Feb. 19 about a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency over a proposed copper-nickel mine in Minnesota, The Associated Press erroneously reported the name of the group filing the lawsuit. It is Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, not Protecting Employees Who...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2019 file photo, a helicopter carrying a body pulled from the mud, days after a Vale dam collapsed, flies over a cemetery with two open graves in Brumadinho, Brazil. Lax regulations, chronic short staffing and a law that muffled the voices of environmentalists on mining licenses made the collapse all but destined to happen, experts and legislators say. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)
February 05, 2019 - 3:39 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil's leading research institute warned Tuesday of a potential health crisis from the failure of a dam in Minas Gerais state, which unleased a flood of muddy mining waste that killed at least 134 people. Fiocruz said the contamination of the ecosystem and the nearby...
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Ray Kemble speaks with reporters outside the Susquehanna County Courthouse in Montrose, Pennsylvania, on Monday, Feb. 4, 2018. A gas driller backed off its demand to have Kemble, a Pennsylvania homeowner who’s long accused the company of polluting his water, thrown in jail over his failure to submit to questioning as part of the company’s $5 million lawsuit against him. (AP Photo/Michael Rubinkam)
February 04, 2019 - 12:45 pm
MONTROSE, Pa. (AP) — A gas driller backed off its demand Monday to have a Pennsylvania homeowner thrown in jail after he agreed to talk to the company's lawyers next month. Houston-based Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. contends Dimock resident Ray Kemble and his former lawyers tried to extort the company...
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