Wildlife population control

September 26, 2019 - 5:21 pm
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — In a story Sept. 25 about swamp rodents, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Central Valley is an agricultural region 130 miles (210 kilometers) north of Sacramento. The Central Valley region spans about 400 miles (645 kilometers) from Redding to Bakersfield...
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File - In this May 4, 2010, file photo, a sea lion tosses a partially eaten salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam, where six more sea lions were trapped earlier in the day with one to be euthanized, in North Bonneville, Wash. More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually in a nearly 300-mile stretch of the Columbia River on the Oregon-Washington border to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead. The National Marine Fisheries Service said Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, it's taking public comments on the plan requested by Idaho, Oregon, Washington and tribes in those states. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
August 30, 2019 - 4:32 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually along a stretch of the Columbia River on the Oregon-Washington border to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead, federal officials said Friday. The National Marine Fisheries Service said it's taking public comments...
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In this photo taken Jan. 1, 2015, giraffe are seen in the Kriger National Park, South Africa. An international conference on endangered species known as CITES being held in Switzerland Thursday, August 22 2019, agreed to protect giraffes for the first time, drawing praise from conservationists and scowls from some sub-Saharan African nations. (AP Photo/Kevin Anderson)
August 22, 2019 - 1:48 pm
GENEVA (AP) — Nations around the world moved Thursday to protect giraffes as an endangered species for the first time, drawing praise from conservationists and scowls from some sub-Saharan African nations. Thursday's vote by a key committee at the World Wildlife Conference known as CITES paves the...
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A Royal Bengal tiger rests at its enclosure at the Alipore zoo in Kolkata, India, Monday, July 29, 2019. India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making the country one of the safest habitats for the endangered animals.Prime Minister Narendra Modi released the tiger count for 2018 on Monday said it's a "historic achievement" for India as the big cat's population had dwindled to 1,400 about 14-15 years ago. (AP Photo/Bikas Das)
July 29, 2019 - 5:30 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making the country one of the safest habitats for the endangered animals. Prime Minister Narendra Modi released the tiger count for 2018 on Monday and said it's a "historic achievement" for India, whose big cat population had...
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Officials examine a decomposing whale that washed ashore, Tuesday, May 28, 2019, in Port Ludlow, Wash. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is looking for private landowners who'd be willing to let a dead whale decompose on their property. The unusual request comes two weeks after the federal agency announced they would study what has caused 81 gray whales to wash up dead on beaches in Alaska, Washington, Oregon and California. (AP Photo/Mario Rivera)
June 21, 2019 - 3:10 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — So many gray whales are dying off the U.S. West Coast that scientists and volunteers dealing with the putrid carcasses have an urgent request for coastal residents: Lend us your private beaches so these ocean giants can rot in peace. The number of dead whales washing ashore in...
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FILE- In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. For years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Salmon researchers perusing data on the website of the Center for Whale Research noticed a startling trend: that for the past two decades, significantly more of the whales have died in even-numbered years than in odd years. In a newly published paper, they speculate that the pattern is related to pink salmon, which return to the waters between Washington state and Canada in enormous numbers every other year. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 19, 2019 - 4:29 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Over the years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Four salmon researchers were perusing data on the...
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January 06, 2019 - 6:51 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Several African countries with some of the world's largest elephant populations will push this year for looser controls on legal ivory trade, while another group of countries on the continent says more restrictions are the best way to curb the illegal killing of elephants for...
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In this photo taken Oct. 4, 2018, eastbound Interstate 90 traffic passes beneath a wildlife bridge under construction on Snoqualmie Pass, Wash. The stretch of highway crossing the Cascade Mountains cuts through old growth forest and wetlands, creating a dangerous border for wildlife everything from an elk down to a small salamander. The new crossing gives animals in these mountains a safer option for crossing the road: They'll be able to go above it. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
December 12, 2018 - 5:17 pm
SNOQUALMIE PASS, Wash. (AP) — Before descending the Cascade Mountains on its final stretch to Seattle, Interstate 90 cuts through a mountain pass of old growth forests and wetlands. For countless wildlife species, the busy highway is a border, constraining their movements and posing a fatal risk...
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FILE - In this March 14, 2018 file photo, a California sea lion designated #U253 heads towards the Pacific Ocean after being released in Newport, Ore. A bill making it easier to kill sea lions that feast on imperiled salmon in the Columbia River has cleared the U.S. Senate. The measure would allow a more streamlined process for Washington, Idaho, Oregon and several Pacific Northwest tribes to capture and euthanize sea lions. The bill sponsored by Idaho Sen. Jim Risch and Washington Sen. Maria Cantwell cleared the Senate Thursday, Dec. 6. It's similar to legislation that the U.S. House passed in June. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
December 07, 2018 - 6:18 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A bill that would make it easier to kill sea lions that feast on imperiled salmon in the Columbia River has cleared the U.S. Senate. State wildlife managers say rebounding numbers of sea lions are eating more salmon than ever and their appetites are undermining billions of dollars of...
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October 07, 2018 - 3:56 am
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Officials say the number of tigers roaming the jungles of Nepal has nearly doubled because of initiatives from the government, conservationists and local authorities who have worked for years to increase the tiger population in the Himalayan nation. Gopal Prakash Bhattarai...
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